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Article ID: 266169 - Last Review: March 1, 2007 - Revision: 5.4

This article was previously published under Q266169
Notice
This article applies to Windows 2000. Support for Windows 2000 ends on July 13, 2010. The Windows 2000 End-of-Support Solution Center (http://support.microsoft.com/?scid=http%3a%2f%2fsupport.microsoft.com%2fwin2000) is a starting point for planning your migration strategy from Windows 2000. For more information see the Microsoft Support Lifecycle Policy (http://support.microsoft.com/lifecycle/) .

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SYMPTOMS

You may experience one or more of the following symptoms:
  • When you try to shut down your Windows 2000-based computer, the computer may stop responding (hang), possibly on a black screen. Also, your computer may hang or may not power off when the shutdown procedure reaches the "It is now safe to turn off your computer" screen.
  • There is no Standby option when you try to shut down your computer.
  • Your computer hangs or you receive a "stop 0x9F" error message when your computer is in Standby mode.
  • There is no Hibernate option when you try to shut down your computer, and there is no Hibernate tab in the Power Options tool in Control Panel.
NOTE: Both Standby mode and Hibernate mode are not available when you start your computer in Safe mode. This behavior is by design because the Standard Display Adapter (VGA) driver is loaded when you start your computer in Safe mode.

CAUSE

This behavior can occur when you have a third-party OEM device driver or service installed on your computer.

RESOLUTION

To troubleshoot this behavior, view the following articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
242495  (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/242495/EN-US/ ) Troubleshooting Advanced Power Management in Windows 2000
246243  (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/246243/EN-US/ ) Troubleshooting STOP 0x9F Error Messages in Windows 2000
If none of these articles helps you resolve the shutdown behavior, use the steps in the following sections to help you find the device driver or service that is causing the shutdown behavior.

This article contains the following sections:
  • How to start your computer in Safe mode
  • How to save a copy of the drivers that are running
  • How to save a copy of the services that are running
  • How to compare the drivers that are running
  • How to create a second profile for driver issues
  • How to troubleshoot problems with services
  • How to create a second profile for service issues
  • How to use a parallel installation to identify the driver or program that is causing the shutdown behavior

How to Start Your Computer in Safe Mode

NOTE: The following procedure assumes that you can shut down your computer when it is in Safe mode. Sometimes a driver may become a lower or upper filter driver for a driver that loads in Safe mode; this can also prevent your computer from shutting down when it is in Safe mode. If the problem is with a service, start your computer in Safe mode, following the steps in the "How to Save a Copy of the Services That Are Running" section, and then follow the steps in the "How to Troubleshoot a Service Problem" section in this article.

Start your computer in Safe mode and log on with administrative privileges. To start your computer in Safe mode, restart your computer, press and hold down the F8 key, and then choose Safe Mode on the Windows 2000 Startup menu.

If you receive a "STOP: 0x0000001e KMODE_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED" error message when you try to start your computer in Safe mode, view the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
261807  (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/261807/EN-US/ ) DirectCD 3.01 Prevents Starting in Safe Mode in Windows 2000

How to Save a Copy of the Drivers That Are Running

To save a copy of the drivers that are running:
  1. Right-click the My Computer icon on your desktop, and then click Manage to open Computer Management.
  2. Under System Tools, expand System Information.
  3. Expand Software Environment, and then click the Drivers folder.
  4. Click the Name column to sort the drivers by name, and then click the State column to sort the column by state. Note that all drivers that are running are displayed in alphabetical order.
  5. Export the list of drivers:
    1. On the Action menu, click Export list.
    2. In the File name box, type drivers.
    3. In the Save as type box, click Text (Comma Delimited) (*.csv).
    4. Save the file on a floppy disk or in another location, and then verify that the file is saved as Drivers.csv.

How to Save a Copy of the Services That Are Running

To save a copy of the services that are running:
  1. Right-click the My Computer icon on your desktop, and then click Manage to open Computer Management.
  2. In Computer Management, locate and expand Services and Applications.
  3. Click Services, and then click Details on the View menu.
  4. Click the Status column, and then click the Status column again to sort the services by status with the started services at the top of the list.
  5. Export the list of services:
    1. On the Action menu, click Export list.
    2. In the File name box, type services.
    3. In the Save as type box, click Text (Comma Delimited) (*.csv).
    4. Save the file on a floppy disk or in another location, and then verify that the file is saved as Services.csv.
  6. Shut down your computer.

How to Compare the Drivers That Are Running

To compare the drivers that are running to the drivers that were running in Safe mode:
  1. Restart your computer, log on, and then follow steps 1 through 5 in the "How to Save a Copy of the Drivers That Are Running" section in this article.
  2. Compare the drivers that are running to the drivers that were running when you started your computer in Safe mode:
    1. Start Microsoft Excel or another spreadsheet program that can open comma-delimited text (.csv) files, and then open the Drivers.csv file that you saved when you started your computer in Safe mode. Note that you may want to print this file on another computer if your computer does not have a spreadsheet program installed.
    2. Compare the list of drivers that are running on your computer with the list of drivers that were running on your computer in Safe mode. Note that any third-party drivers that are running on your computer that were not running when your computer was in Safe mode may be causing this shutdown behavior.
    3. If you can identify any third-party OEM drivers that are running, try to uninstall the device drivers. You can also uninstall or disable the device in Device Manager. Note that if you uninstall a Plug and Play device in Device Manager, Windows 2000 may redetect the device when you restart your computer. You may need to physically remove the hardware or rename the OEM installation .inf file for that device.

      When you install an OEM driver, the Windows Installer program copies the OEM oemsetup.inf file to the %SystemRoot%\INF folder, and then renames the oemsetup.inf file to OEM#.inf, where # is an incremental number for each OEM driver that is installed.

      After you install the OEM driver, start Windows Explorer, and then temporarily move any %SystemRoot%\INF\Oem#.inf and Oem#.pnf files (where # is a number) to an another location. If you want to identify a specific Oem#.inf file, you can open the file in Notepad.For additional information about device drivers, click the article numbers below to view the articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
      199276  (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/199276/EN-US/ ) How to Manage Devices in Windows 2000
      268852  (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/268852/EN-US/ ) How to Force Windows 2000 to Use Standard VGA Compatible Driver
  3. After you uninstall or disable the device that is causing the shutdown behavior, restart your computer several times to verify that it shuts down correctly, and then contact the OEM manufacturer to report the behavior and ask if there are updated drivers available for the device.
NOTE: If you use the device that is causing the shutdown behavior only occasionally, you can create a new hardware profile in which you can start your computer with the device enabled or disabled. You can set the device as disabled in your default hardware profile, and set the problem device as enabled for the new hardware profile.

How to Create a Second Profile for Driver Issues

To set the device as disabled in your default hardware profile and then set the problem device as enabled in the new hardware profile:
  1. Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel.
  2. Double-click System, and then click Hardware Profiles on the Hardware tab.
  3. Click Copy, type no-shutdown in the To box, and then click OK to save a copy of the profile.
  4. On the Hardware tab, click Device Manager.
  5. In Device Manager, right-click the device that is preventing your computer from shutting down, and then click Properties.
  6. In the Device usage box, click Do not use this device in the current hardware profile (disabled).
When you do this, your computer does shut down normally when you start it with the default profile. When you want to use the device that causes the shutdown behavior, start your computer with the new, no-shutdown profile that has the device enabled.

If the shutdown problem is not caused by a device driver, the behavior may be caused by a third-party service. Troubleshoot the services in the same way that you troubleshot the drivers.

How to Troubleshoot Problems with Services

To troubleshoot a problem that your computer is having with a service:
  1. Restart your computer, log on, and then compare the services that are running with the services that were running when you started your computer in Safe mode:
    1. Right-click the My Computer icon on your desktop, and then click Manage to open Computer Management.
    2. Locate and expand Services and Applications.
    3. Click Services, and then click Detail on the View menu.
    4. Click the Status column, and then click the Status column again to sort the services by status with the started services at the top of the list.
    5. Start Excel or another spreadsheet program that can open comma-delimited text files, and then open the Services.csv file that you saved. Note that you may want to print this file on another computer if your computer does not have a spreadsheet program installed.
    6. Compare the list of services that are running on your computer with the list of services that were running in Safe mode. Note that any third-party services that are running on your computer that were not running when your computer was in Safe mode may be causing this shutdown behavior.
    7. If you can identify third-party OEM services that are running, try to uninstall or disable the service.
  2. After you uninstalled or disable the service that is causing the shutdown behavior, restart your computer several times to verify that it shuts down correctly, and then contact the OEM vendor to report the behavior and ask if there is an update available to resolve the shutdown behavior.
NOTE: If you only use the service that is causing the shutdown behavior occasionally, you can create a new hardware profile in which you can start your computer with the service enabled or disabled. You can set the service as disabled in your default hardware profile, and set the problem device as enabled for the new hardware profile.

How to Create a Second Profile for Service Issues

To create a second profile, set the service as disabled in your default hardware profile, and then set the problem device as enabled for the new hardware profile:
  1. Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel.
  2. In Control Panel, double-click System.
  3. Click Hardware Profiles on the Hardware tab.
  4. Click Copy, type no-shutdown in the To box, and then click OK to save a copy of the profile.
To disable a service in the default profile:
  1. Click Start, point to Search, and then click For Files or Folders.
  2. In the Search for files or folders named box, type services.msc.
  3. In the Look in box, click Local Harddrives, and then click Search Now.
  4. Double-click the Services.msc file.
  5. In the Services dialog box, right-click the service that is causing the shutdown behavior, and then click Properties.
  6. Click Disable on the Log On tab to disable the service in the default profile.
When you do this, your computer does shut down normally when you start it with the default profile. When you want to use the device that causes the shutdown behavior, start your computer with the new, no-shutdown profile that has the device enabled.

How to Use a Parallel Installation to Identify the Driver or Program That Is Causing the Shutdown Behavior

Install a new copy of Windows 2000 on a separate partition on your computer. After you install the new copy, install third-party drivers (or programs that install or start services) one at a time on your parallel installation. Restart your computer several times each time that you install a new driver or program. When the parallel installation exhibits the same shutdown behavior, the last driver or program that you installed is the driver or program that is causing the shutdown behavior. To resolve this behavior, remove the driver or program from the original installation. After you do this, delete the parallel installation.

MORE INFORMATION

For additional information about how to troubleshoot issues that you may have with shutting down, Standby mode, and Hibernate mode, click the article numbers below to view the articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
257562  (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/257562/EN-US/ ) Hibernate and Standby Are Not Available When Using Standard VGA
237551  (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/237551/EN-US/ ) Advanced Power Management Features Are Disabled with Terminal Services
259889  (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/259889/EN-US/ ) Standby Option Not Available in Multiple-Processor Configuration
255182  (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/255182/EN-US/ ) Hibernate Tab Is Not Available in Power Options Tool in Control Panel
197477  (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/197477/EN-US/ ) The System Cannot Go to Standby Mode Because the...
257199  (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/257199/EN-US/ ) Device Driver Error Message Is Displayed When the Computer Enters Standby or Hibernate Mode
247480  (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/247480/EN-US/ ) Error Message After Setting Hibernation on Computer with Modem
247290  (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/247290/EN-US/ ) APM Standby Option Is Missing on PCs Without a Battery
252471  (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/252471/EN-US/ ) Error Message: Removable Storage Manager Refused the Request to Hibernate or Suspend the System
259623  (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/259623/EN-US/ ) Standby Feature Is Available on Computers with a Battery or ACPI
211205  (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/211205/EN-US/ ) Dell and IBM Notebook Computers May Not Suspend
247238  (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/247238/EN-US/ ) Standby in Shut Down Not Available in IBM ThinkPad 380XD When APM Is Enabled
211271  (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/211271/EN-US/ ) Cannot Hibernate Windows 2000 After Installing or Uninstalling McAfee AntiVirus 3.1.4

APPLIES TO
  • Microsoft Windows 2000 Server
  • Microsoft Windows 2000 Advanced Server
  • Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional Edition
Keywords: 
kberrmsg kbhowto kbpowerman kbsafemod KB266169
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