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Article ID: 2934538 - Last Review: March 13, 2014 - Revision: 2.0

Symptoms

Microsoft Outlook 2010 and Microsoft Outlook 2013 may crash when you start Outlook, when you perform various tasks in Outlook, or when you close Outlook. This can be very frustrating, because the problem usually occurs randomly. This random behavior makes it difficult to determine the cause of the crash. This article contains steps that you can use to determine why Outlook crashed.

Important This article contains information about how to modify the registry. Make sure that you back up the registry before you modify it Make sure that you know how to restore the registry if a problem occurs. For more information about how to back up, restore, and modify the registry, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

322756  (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/322756/ ) How to back up and restore the registry in Windows XP

For more information about how to back up the registry in Windows Vista, go to the following Microsoft website:

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows-vista/Back-up-the-registry (http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows-vista/Back-up-the-registry)

For more information about how to back up the registry in Windows 7, go to the following Microsoft website:

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows7/Back-up-the-registry (http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows7/Back-up-the-registry) http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows7/Back-up-the-registry (http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows7/Back-up-the-registry)

More information

To troubleshoot crashes in Outlook 2010 and Outlook 2013, you can use several diagnostic tools and steps discussed in this article. The following steps are intentionally ordered to help you quickly identify the main causes of crashes in Outlook. However, you can skip those steps if you are confident they are not relevant to your issue.

STEP 1: Run the Outlook Product Stability Diagnostic tool

The Outlook Product Stability Diagnostic tool has the following features that can help you isolate known causes of crashes in Outlook.

  • Temporarily remove COM add-ins and Extensions
  • Identify and report known problematic configurations
The Outlook Product Stability Diagnostic also creates a diagnostic report outlining the data it collected and recommendations on possible steps you can take to reduce or eliminate Outlook stability issues.

Please click the following link to run the Outlook Product Stability Diagnostic tool in the Microsoft Fix it Center Pro portal:

Outlook Product Stability Diagnostic (https://login.live.com/login.srf?wa=wsignin1.0&rpsnv=12&ct=1392605429&rver=6.4.6456.0&wp=MBI_SSL&wreply=https%3A%2F%2Fwc.ficp.support.microsoft.com%2FDashboards%2FMain%2FSelfHelpCase%2FCreate%3Fshowreturn%3DTrue%26KBIDs%3D2764035&lc=1033&id=278480)

Note You will need to sign into the Fix it Center Pro portal with a Microsoft Account to access the Outlook Product Stability Diagnostic tool. Please see the following article for details on Microsoft Accounts:

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows-live/sign-in-what-is-microsoft-account (http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows-live/sign-in-what-is-microsoft-account)

Then, use the following steps to isolate problematic add-ins.

Important The steps below may take a significant amount of time to properly complete. We recommend you start these steps if you have ample time to complete them. Also, sometimes problems can be the result of two or more add-ins that do no interoperate well together. If removing one add-in seems to resolve the problem, the problem may not necessarily be the fault of that add-in.

  • Initial run of the Outlook Product Stability Diagnostic (Temporarily remove COM add-ins and client extensions).
    1. Start Outlook.
    2. Start the Outlook Product Stability Diagnostic tool.
    3. When prompted, select the Temporarily remove problematic items found by this diagnostic. (The screen shot for this step is listed below).
      Collapse this imageExpand this image

    4. Close Outlook when prompted by the diagnostic.
    5. Read the information in the following dialog box when it appears.
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    6. Start Outlook.
    7. Click Next in the diagnostic dialog box.
    8. In the Report Saved dialog box for the diagnostic, click Open Report. (The screen shot for this step is listed below).
      Collapse this imageExpand this image
    9. Review the information shown in the OutlookCrashDiagnosticsReport.html file that is opened in your default browser. Especially take note of the information under the Recommendations and Additional Actions to Take section of the report.
      Collapse this imageExpand this image
    10. Click Next in the Report Saved dialog box to end the initial running of the Outlook Product Stability Diagnostic.

      At this point, there will not be any COM add-ins loaded in Outlook. They were all disabled by the initial running of the Outlook Product Stability Diagnostic. This can be seen in the COM Add-Ins dialog box in Outlook (on the File tab, click Options, then click Add-Ins).
      Collapse this imageExpand this image


      Per the information in the OutlookCrashDiagnosticsReport.html file, you have several options, depending on the stability of Outlook and functionality that may or may not be missing in Outlook:
      • Continue to use Outlook in this configuration.
        If you are not missing any functionality and Outlook remains stable, then our recommendation is to continue using Outlook as-is.
      • Un-do changes made by the diagnostic.
        If Outlook is still unstable after disabling all COM add-ins, re-run the diagnostic to undo the changes made during the initial running of the diagnostic. Please use the steps below in the Undo changes made by the Outlook Product Stability Diagnostic section to undo changest made by the diagnostic.
      • Re-enable COM add-ins one at a time
        If Outlook is stable with COM add-ins disabled, but you are missing some of the functionality provided by add-ins, please use the process described below in the Re-enabling COM add-ins one-by-one section to re-enable COM add-ins one at a time.
  • Re-enabling COM add-ins one-by-one


    If Outlook is stable with COM add-ins disabled, but you are missing some of the functionality provided by add-ins, please use the following steps to re-enable COM add-ins one at a time.

    NOTE: If you re-enable COM add-ins, you may re-introduce instability in Outlook. If Outlook becomes unstable after re-enabling a particular COM add-in, you will want to contact the add-in vendor to see if they have an updated version that is more stable with Outlook.
    1. Start Outlook.
    2. On the File tab, click Options, then click Add-Ins.
    3. In the bottom of the Outlook Options dialog box, make sure the Manage drop-down shows COM Add-ins, and then click Go. (The screen shot for this step is listed below).
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    4. In the COM Add-Ins dialog box, select to enable an add-in and then click OK. The following figure shows the re-enabling of the Microsoft Exchange Add-in. (The screen shot for this step is listed below).
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    5. Repeat step 4 until you have all of the required Outlook functionality and Outlook remains stable.

      If Outlook becomes unstable after re-enabling a particular COM add-in, disable that COM add-in and then contact the add-in vendor to see if they have an updated version that is more stable with Outlook.

      If Outlook becomes unstable to the point where you are unable to disable a particular COM add-in, then use the following steps to regain stability in Outlook:
      1. Use the steps below in the Un-do changes made by the diagnostic section.
        This will temporarily re-enable all COM add-ins.
      2. Go back to the top of this article and re-run the steps in the Initial run of the Outlook Product Stability Diagnostic section.
        This will allow you to once again disable all COM add-ins.
      3. Repeat the steps above in the Re-enabling COM add-ins one-by-one section but do not re-enable the add-in that introduces instability in Outlook.
      4. Contact the add-in vendor to see if they have an updated version that is more stable with Outlook.
  • Un-do changes made by the Outlook Product Stability Diagnostic

    If Outlook is still unstable after disabling all COM add-ins, use the following steps to re-run the diagnostic to undo the changes made during the initial running of the diagnostic. In this situation, the Outlook instability is likely not caused by a COM add-in so these steps re-enable all COM add-ins.
    1. Exit Outlook if it is running.
    2. Start the Outlook Product Stability Diagnostic.
    3. Select the Undo previous changes made by this diagnostic option. (The screen shot for this step is listed below).
      Collapse this imageExpand this image
    4. Click Next when you see the You're all set notification. (The screen shot for this step is listed below).
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    5. Continue troubleshooting the Outlook instability problem by using the Office Configuration Analyzer Tool (OffCAT) discussed in the next section of this article.

Step 2: Run the Office Configuration Analyzer Tool (OffCAT)

OffCAT is another diagnostic program that provides a very detailed report of your current Outlook profile. This report includes many parameters about your profile and highlights any known problems that it found in your profile. For any problems that are listed in the report, you are provided with a link to a Microsoft Knowledge Base (KB) article that outlines a possible fix for the problem.

Use the following link to download and install the Office Configuration Analyzer Tool:

OffCAT Download (http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=36852)

If you are still unable to reduce or eliminate your crashes in Outlook, try the steps in the remaining sections of this article. The sections are listed in a logical manner, so please make sure to follow the these steps in the provided order.

Step 3: Can you reproduce the problem?

Try to reproduce the problem by repeating the actions that first caused the problem. For example, Outlook may crash every time that you open a specific meeting in your calendar. Or, Outlook may crash when you start it. If you can identify the steps that cause Outlook to crash consistently, you may be able to work around this problem without following the remaining troubleshooting steps. For example, if Outlook crashes only when you open a specific email message, you can try the following steps to resolve the problem:

1. Ask the sender of the email message to resend the email message.

2. If the email message is not important, delete it.

3. If you have another email client, try to view the email message by using that client. For example, if you can access your mailbox by using Microsoft Office Outlook Web Access (OWA), try to read the email message by using OWA. If you can read the message in OWA, you can try to forward the email message to yourself and then check whether you can open the forwarded email message in Outlook 2010.

Even if you cannot work around the problem, make sure that you fully note the steps to reproduce the crash in Outlook. Noting these steps will let you more effectively use the remaining troubleshooting steps.

If you cannot consistently reproduce the problem, you can still use the remaining steps.

If you can identify the steps that cause Outlook to crash consistently, you may be able to work around this problem without following the remaining troubleshooting steps. For example, if Outlook crashes only when you open a specific email message, you can try the following steps to resolve the problem:

  1. Ask the sender of the email message to resend the email message.
  2. If the email message is not important, delete it.
  3. If you have another email client, try to view the email message by using that client. For example, if you can access your mailbox by using Microsoft Office Outlook Web Access (OWA), try to read the email message by using OWA. If you can read the message in OWA, you can try to forward the email message to yourself and then check whether you can open the forwarded email message in Outlook 2010.
Even if you cannot work around the problem, make sure that you fully note the steps to reproduce the crash in Outlook. Noting these steps will let you more effectively use the remaining troubleshooting steps.

If you cannot consistently reproduce the problem, you can still use the remaining steps.

Step 4: Update Outlook with the latest cumulative updates

Cumulative updates contain every update that is available for Outlook. The issue that you are experiencing in Outlook may be resolved by a code change that is available in the cumulative update. You may be unable to determine whether the issue that you are experiencing will be resolved by the cumulative update unless you install the update and test Outlook. Therefore, we recommend that you update Outlook to the latest build and then see whether the problem that you are experiencing is resolved.

For more information about obtaining the latest cumulative updates for Outlook, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

2625547  (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2625547/ ) How to install the latest applicable updates for Microsoft Outlook (US English only)

If Outlook still crashes after you install the latest cumulative updates, follow the remaining troubleshooting steps.

Step 5: Start Outlook by using an appropriate command-line switch

Outlook has many command-line switches that help you quickly reset certain application settings. You may be able use an appropriate command-line switch from the following table.

For example, Outlook may crash if the message that is selected is corrupted. In this case, Outlook crashes when it tries to display the selected message in the Reading Pane. Therefore, you can try to start Outlook by using the /NoPreview switch. This switch disables the Reading Pane.

Refer to the following table for a list of other useful command-line switches and their functions.

Note Use a switch only if it is clearly related to the cause of your problem. Before you use a switch, make sure that you evaluate any changes that occur because of the switch.

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SwitchAction takenComment
/cleanviewsRestores default views. All custom views that you created are lost.
/cleanremindersClears and regenerates reminders.Useful if you suspect that the crash is related to reminders.
/cleanrulesDeletes all client-based and all server-based rules.If you want to keep a backup of your rules, make sure that you export your rules. To do this, click Rules from the Ribbon, and then click Manage Rules & Alerts. This gives you the option to import your rules after this switch deletes them.
/cleansharingRemoves all RSS, Internet Calendar, and SharePoint subscriptions from Account Settings but leaves all the previously downloaded content on your computer.You will have to reestablish any RSS, Internet Calendar, or SharePoint subscriptions after you use this switch.
/resettodobarClears and regenerates the To-Do Bar task list for the current profile. The To-Do Bar search folder is deleted and re-created. Not available in Outlook 2013.
/resetnavpaneClears and regenerates the Navigation Pane for the current profile.
/cleanroamedprefsAll previous roamed preferences are deleted and then copied again from the local settings on the computer on which this switch is used. These settings include the roaming settings for reminders, the free/busy grid, working hours, calendar publishing, and RSS rules.
/safeMore details about this switch are provided in the next section, "Start Outlook in safe mode."



For more information about Outlook 2010 command-line switches and how to use them, visit the following Microsoft Office Online website:

Command-line switches for Microsoft Outlook 2010 (http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/outlook-help/command-line-switches-for-outlook-2010-HP010354956.aspx)

For more information about Outlook 2013 command-line switches and how to use them, visit the following Microsoft Office Online website:

Command-line switches for Microsoft Outlook 2013 (http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/outlook-help/command-line-switches-for-outlook-2013-HA102606406.aspx)

Step 6: Start Outlook in safe mode

When you start Outlook in safe mode, many of the customizations that you have made to Outlook are not loaded. Instead, these settings are replaced temporarily by the default settings. Additionally, COM add-ins and Exchange Client Extensions are not loaded. This behavior reduces the number of dynamic-link libraries (DLL) that interact with Outlook and with your data.

To start Outlook in safe mode, use the /safe command-line switch. To determine whether you are running Outlook in safe mode, view the title bar of Outlook.

You may also see the following prompt when you restart Outlook after a crash:

Outlook failed to start correctly last time. Starting Outlook in safe mode
will help you correct or isolate a startup problem in order to successfully start
the program. Some functionality may be disabled in this mode.

Do you want to start Outlook in safe mode?

If you click Yes at this prompt, Outlook starts in safe mode.

Refer to the following table for a partial list of the temporary changes that occur when you start Outlook in safe mode:

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No.Issues
a.The Reading Pane is not displayed.
b.No COM Add-ins are loaded.
c.Customized toolbars are not displayed.
d.Navigation Pane customizations are not loaded.
e.The NormalEmail.dotm template (on which new email messages are based) is not
loaded.
f.Form Regions are not available.
g.Any RSS registry settings are not used. For example, if you have the "Sync RSS Feeds to the Common Feed List" option enabled, it is disabled in safe mode.
h.Any registry settings under the following non-policy keys are not loaded. (All keys are under the HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Office\14.0\Outlook key.)

\Options\Wss
\Options\General
\Options\RSS
\Options\Pubcal
\Options\Calendar
i.To-Do Bar customizations are not loaded.
j.Daily Task list (in the Calendar module) customizations are not loaded.
k.All Instant Search functionality in Outlook (that is provided by WDS) and customization
are disabled.
l.Ribbon customizations are not loaded.
m.Quick Access Toolbar customizations are not loaded.
n.The registry settings under the following key are not loaded:

HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Office\x.0\Common\MailSettings

Note: x.0 in the above registry key represents 14.0 for Outlook 2010, 15.0 for Outlook 2013.

The settings that are stored under this key can be configured by clicking on the File tab, clicking on the Options category, clicking the Mail group, clicking the Stationery and Fonts button, and then clicking on the Personal Stationery tab.
o.Macros may not load.

This occurs because the Macro Security setting is configured to the default setting ("Notifications for digitally signed macros; all other macros disabled").
p.Default colors and fonts are not loaded. For example, any color/font customizations that you made to calendar options, to task options, or to Notes options are not used.

What to do if Outlook does not crash when you start it in safe mode

  1. Review the list of disabled items, and then try to identify those items that are related to the steps that you took that caused Outlook to crash.
  2. Check whether you have any third-party add-ins or extensions that are loaded in Outlook. To check for third-party COM add-ins and to disable them, follow these steps:
    • Disable COM add-ins
      1. On the File tab, click the Options category.
      2. Click Add-ins.
      3. Select COM Add-ins from the Manage box, and then click Go.
      4. Click to clear the check box for any add-ins that you want to disable.
      5. Click OK, and then restart Outlook.
    If you cannot start Outlook so that you can disable COM add-ins by using the Outlook interface, you can disable the COM add-ins by using Registry Editor. To do this, follow these steps:

    Note If you can use the Outlook interface to disable COM add-ins, you should skip these steps and go to the "Verify that all third-party DLLs are removed from the Outlook process" section.

    a. Start Registry Editor.

    b. Locate the following registry key:

    HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Office\Outlook\Addins

    c. Rename every subkey under the \Addins key by appending –disabled to the subkey name. For example, if a subkey is called AccessAddin.DC, rename this subkey to AccessAddin.DC-disabled.

    d. Locate the following registry key:

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Office\Outlook\Addins

    e. Rename every subkey under the \Addins key by appending –disabled to the subkey name. For example, if a subkey is called UCAddin.UCAddin.1, rename the subkey to UCAddin.UCAddin.1-disabled.

    f. Start Outlook.
  • Verify that all third-party DLLs are removed from the Outlook process

    To make sure that there are no third-party DLLs running under the Outlook.exe process, run Process Explorer, and then analyze the DLLs that are running under Outlook.exe. To do this, follow the steps that are described in the following Knowledge Base article:

    970920  (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/970920 / ) Using Process Explorer to list DLLs running under the Outlook.exe process

    If you find that there are third-party DLLs that are still running under the Outlook.exe process after you disable all COM add-ins and all Exchange Client Extensions, you may have to uninstall the parent software for these DLLs by using the Add or Remove Programs item in Control Panel. As long as there are third-party DLLs that are running under the Outlook.exe process, you cannot eliminate these DLLs as the cause of the crash. See the third-party software documentation for more information about how to remove Outlook integration for these DLLs or on how to uninstall the software.

    If Outlook continues to crash although there are no third-party DLLs running under the Outlook.exe process, these DLLs are not your problem. Therefore, we recommend that you re-enable all COM add-ins and Exchange Client Extensions that you disabled. Then, skip the next section, "Identifying the add-in or the extension that causes Outlook 2010 to crash," and go to step 3 of the "What to do if Outlook 2010 does not crash when you start it in safe mode" section.

    If Outlook stopped crashing after you disabled all COM add-ins and Exchange Client Extensions, go to the next section, "Identifying the add-in or the extension that causes Outlook 2010 to crash."
  • Identifying the add-in or the extension that causes Outlook to crash

    If Outlook stopped crashing after you removed all third-party DLLs that were running under the Outlook.exe process, you can use the following process to isolate and to identify the software that is causing the problem.

    Re-enable the COM add-ins that you disabled from File - Options

    Note If you did not use File - Options to disable the COM add-ins, and if you had to rename the different subkeys that are located under the \Addins registry key in the "Disable COM add-ins" section, skip the following steps. Instead, go to the "Re-enable the COM Add-ins that you disabled by using Registry Editor" section.

    a. In File - Options, re-enable one COM add-in.

    b. Exit Outlook, and then restart Outlook.

    c. If Outlook does not crash after you start it, repeat steps a and b for another extension. Repeat step c until Outlook crashes again.

    d. Contact the vendor of the COM add-in that is causing Outlook to crash, and then check whether there is an update to that COM add-in.

    Re-enable the COM Add-ins that you disabled by using Registry Editor

    Note Follow these steps only if you had to rename the subkeys under the \Addins registry key in the steps that are listed in the "Disable COM add-ins" section.

    a. Close Outlook if it is running.

    b. Start Registry Editor.

    c. Locate the following registry key:

    HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Office\Outlook\Addins

    d. Locate the first subkey that you renamed by adding "-disabled" to its name. Then, rename this subkey by removing "-disabled" from this subkey’s name.

    e. Start Outlook.

    f. If Outlook does not crash when you start it, repeat steps a through e until Outlook crashes again.

    g. If Outlook still does not crash after you rename all the subkeys under the registry path that is listed in step c, continue to step h.

    h. Close Outlook.

    i. Locate the following registry key:

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Office\Outlook\Addins

    j. Locate the first subkey that you renamed by adding "-disabled" to its name. Then, rename this subkey by removing "-disabled" from this subkey’s name.

    k. Restart Outlook.

    l. If Outlook does not crash when you start it, repeat steps h through k until Outlook crashes again.

    m. Contact the vendor of the COM add-in that is causing Outlook to crash, and then check whether there is an update to that COM add-in.
3. Many of the items that you disabled by using safe mode are features that store their settings in the registry. Therefore, you should also consider following these steps if Outlook did not crash when you used safe mode:

a. Close Outlook if it is running.

b. Start Registry Editor.

c. Browse to the following registry location:

HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Office\x.0\Outlook

Note x.0 in the above registry key represents 14.0 for Outlook 2010, 15.0 for Outlook 2013.

d. Rename the \Outlook part of this key to \Outlook-1.

e. Restart Outlook.

When you restart Outlook, a new \Outlook registry key that has default settings is created in this location.

If your installation of Outlook does not crash when you use this configuration, one or more settings under the original \Outlook key are the cause of the problem. Because there are many settings in this key, we recommend that you continue to use Outlook in this configuration.

If Outlook continues to crash when you use this configuration, you can go to the "Scope the Problem" section and use the new default registry key. Or, you can revert to your original registry settings by following these steps:

a. Close Outlook if it is running.

b. Start Registry Editor.

c. Browse to the following registry location:

HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Office\x.0\Outlook

Note x.0 in the above registry key represents 14.0 for Outlook 2010, 15.0 for Outlook 2013.

d. Rename the \Outlook part of this key to \Outlook-2.

e. Browse to the following registry location:

HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Office\x.0\Outlook-1

Note x.0 in the above registry key represents 14.0 for Outlook 2010, 15.0 for Outlook 2013.

f. Rename the \Outlook-1 part of this key to \Outlook.

g. Start Outlook.

Step 7: Scope the problem with a new Outlook profile, Windows profile, or computer

The practice of "scoping" means that you try to reduce the possible sources that are causing Outlook to crash. The following sets of steps are frequently used by Microsoft product support engineers to help customers scope many Outlook problems. These problems include crashes.

1.Try an Outlook profile that has no email accounts

Outlook can be started by using a profile that contains no email accounts. By using a profile that contains no email accounts, you can test whether Outlook is crashing because of functions that are usually performed while sending and receiving email messages or while synchronizing with Microsoft Exchange.

To create an Outlook profile that contains no email accounts, follow these steps:

a. Close Outlook if it is running.

b. Open the Mail item in Control Panel, and then click Show Profiles.

c. In the Mail dialog box, click Add.

d. Type PIM for the name of the new profile, and then click OK.

e. In the Add New E-mail Accounts dialog box, click Cancel.

f. Click OK when you are prompted to create a profile that contains no email accounts.

g. Configure the "PIM" (Personal Information Manager) profile so that it is your default profile. To do this, check Always use this profile, and then select "PIM".

h. Click OK to close the Mail item.

i. Start Outlook.

j. In the Outlook 2010 Startup dialog box, click Next.

k. In the E-mail Accounts dialog box, select the No option, and then click Next.

l. In the Create Data File dialog box, check Continue with no e-mail support, and then click Finish.

After you complete the previous steps, Outlook is running without any email accounts. Therefore, you cannot send or receive email messages. However, you can add your existing .pst files to the PIM profile to see whether these .pst files are the cause of the problem.

If Outlook does not crash when you use the PIM profile, go to the "Try a new Outlook profile" section.

If Outlook continues to crash when you use the PIM profile, go to the "Try a new Windows profile" section.

2.Try a new Outlook profile.

Use the Mail item in Control Panel to create a new Outlook profile that contains all your regular email accounts. However, when you create the new profile, do the following:

a. Do not delete your original Outlook profile.

b. Do not create your new profile by using a copy of your original profile.

Notes

We recommend that you keep your original profile, because the original profile may not be the source of your problem. Creating a new Outlook profile is only a test to help you see whether your original profile is causing Outlook to crash.

If you have more than one email account in your profile, you may test your problem by adding only one email account at a time. This practice will let you isolate a problematic email account, much as you isolated problematic add-ins and extensions.

For more information about how to create a new Outlook profile, refer to the following Knowledge Base article:

829918  (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/829918/ ) How to create and configure email profiles in Outlook

Outlook does not crash when you use a new Outlook profile

If Outlook does not crash after you create a new profile, the easiest solution is use the new profile that you created. If you have .pst files that are associated with your original profile, you can use the Mail item in Control Panel to update your new Outlook profile so that it references these .pst files. For more information about how to manage .pst files in Outlook, refer to the following Knowledge Base article:

287070  (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/287070/ ) How to manage .pst files in Outlook

Outlook continues to crash when you use a new Outlook profile

If the problem continues when you use a new Outlook profile, the problem may be related to the data in your mailbox. This data may be visible or hidden. To determine whether this data is the cause of your problem, try to use a different mailbox. To do this, follow these steps:

a. Do not log off from your current Windows profile.

b. Use the Mail item in Control Panel to create a new Outlook profile for another user’s mailbox.

c. If this is an Exchange mailbox, configure this new profile to always prompt for credentials. To do this, follow these steps:

i. On the E-mail Accounts tab in the Account Settings dialog box, select the Exchange mailbox, and then click Change.
ii. In the Change E-mail Account dialog box, click More Settings.
iii. On the Security tab of the Microsoft Exchange dialog box, select Always prompt for logon credentials.

d. Start Outlook by using this new profile.

e. Test Outlook to confirm whether Outlook still crashes.

If the problem no longer occurs when you use Outlook together with a different mailbox, you should contact the system administrator. The system administrator may be able to help with mailbox corruption.

If the problem continues when you use Outlook together with a different mailbox, go to the "Try a new Windows profile" section.

3.Try a new Windows profile

Outlook uses data that is located in several different registry entries under the HKEY_CURRENT_USER key and in data files in your local Windows profile. Therefore, you can test Outlook by using a new Windows profile to eliminate many of these settings and files as the cause of your problem.

Note Do not delete your current Windows profile for this test. Instead, create a new Windows profile, and then test Outlook by using this new profile.

To test Outlook by using a new Windows profile, follow these steps:

a. Log off from Windows.

b. Log on to Windows by using a different account.Note You may have to create a new local account for testing. Because there are several ways to create a Windows profile, refer to your Windows Help documentation for information if you need help in creating a new profile. c. Create an Outlook profile for your mailbox by using the Mail item in Control Panel.

d. Start Outlook, and then verify that Outlook still crashes.

If Outlook still crashes when you use a new Windows profile, go to the "Outlook still crashes when you use a new Windows profile" section.

If Outlook does not crash when you use a new Windows profile, go to the "Outlook does not crash when you use a new Windows profile" section.

Outlook still crashes when you use a new Windows profile

If Outlook still crashes when you use a new Windows profile, follow these steps.

Note At this point in the troubleshooting process, you have determined that your problem is not caused by the user data in your original Windows profile.

a. Close Outlook.

b. Log off from this new Windows account, and then log back in to your original Windows account.

c. Go to the "Testing to see whether the problem is computer related" section of this document.

Outlook does not crash when you use a new Windows profile

If Outlook does not crash when you use a new Windows profile, you have the following options:

  • Continue to use the new Windows profile

    If you want to continue using the new Windows profile, you can retrieve your personal documents from the original profile. By default, your personal documents are stored in the My Documents folder in the profile path of the Windows account. For example, on a Windows XP-based computer, your documents are stored in the following location: C:\Documents and Settings\<user name>\My Documents.

    Note The placeholder <user name>represents the user name of your Windows profile.

    If you cannot access this folder location by using the new Windows profile, you can follow these steps to recover your documents from the original Windows profile:

    a. Log off from Windows.

    b. Log on to Windows by using your original Windows profile.

    c. Locate the documents that you want to transfer to the new Windows profile.

    d. Copy these documents to a separate drive or to a folder path on a drive that can be accessed by all Windows accounts. For example, you can copy your documents to a USB storage device or to the C:\Backup folder.

    Note You may have to create the C:\Backup folder.

    e. Log off from Windows.

    f. Log on to Windows by using your new Windows profile.

    g. Copy your documents to the My Documents folder of your new Windows profile.
  • Continue to troubleshoot the problem by using your original Windows profile

    If you decide that you do not want to use the new Windows profile, you can try to locate the specific user data that is causing the problem. To do this, follow these steps:

    a. Close Outlook if it is running.

    b. Start Registry Editor.

    c. Browse to the following registry location:

    HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Office\x.0

    d. Rename this key to \x.0-old

    Note: x.0 in the above registry key represents 14.0 for Outlook 2010, 15.0 for Outlook 2013.

    e. Restart Outlook.

    After you do this, Outlook performs a new first-run start. Therefore, Outlook should prompt you for your user name and your initials again.

    If Outlook does not crash after you rename the \x.0 registry key, we recommend that you keep the current modifications to the registry. This means that you will have to reconfigure some previous customizations to your Office programs. Isolating the specific registry data that caused Outlook to crash is very difficult without using advanced debugging tools.

    If Outlook still crashes after you rename the \x.0 registry key, we recommended that you restore the registry. To do this, follow these steps:

    a. Close Outlook if Outlook is running.

    b. Start Registry Editor.

    c. Browse to the following registry location:

    HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Office\x.0

    d. Rename this key to \x.0-new

    e. Rename the \x.0-old key to \x.0.

    Note: x.0 in the above registry key represents 14.0 for Outlook 2010, 15.0 for Outlook 2013.

    After you do this, we recommend that you use your new Windows profile instead of your original Windows profile. To help you migrate your data to the new Windows profile, you should follow the steps in the "Continue to use the new Windows profile" section earlier in this article.

4. How to test to see whether the problem is related to this specific computer

The problem may be related to this specific computer. The cause may be bad RAM, conflicting software, corrupted files, incorrect registry data under the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE hive, or even a problem with your Windows installation. To see whether your problem is related to this specific computer, you can use the following tests to isolate the problem.
  • Use Outlook on a different computer

    If you have access to another computer that has Outlook installed, try to log on to that computer, and then use Outlook together with your mailbox.
  • Windows Clean Boot

    Use the System Configuration utility to troubleshoot your problem. To do this, follow the steps in the following articles, as appropriate for your operating system:

    310560  (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/310560/ ) How to troubleshoot configuration errors by using the System Configuration utility in Windows XP

    950093  (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/950093/ ) How to use the System Configuration utility to troubleshoot configuration errors in Windows Vista

    Windows 7 - Using System Configuration (http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/Using-System-Configuration)

Step 8: Contact Microsoft Product Support

If Outlook still crashes even after you perform all the troubleshooting steps in this article, we recommended that you contact Microsoft Customer Support to help diagnose the problem. An issue that has not yet been fixed may be the cause of the problem. Your support engineer can help you make that determination.

Note If you do contact the Outlook support team at Microsoft; please give them the results and data for all the previous tests

For more information about contacting Microsoft Product Support, go to the following Microsoft website:

http://support.microsoft.com/contactus/ (http://support.microsoft.com/contactus/)

Note This is a "FAST PUBLISH" article created directly from within the Microsoft support organization. The information contained herein is provided as-is in response to emerging issues. As a result of the speed in making it available, the materials may include typographical errors and may be revised at any time without notice. See Terms of Use (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=151500) for other considerations.

Applies to
  • Microsoft Outlook 2010
  • Microsoft Outlook 2013
Keywords: 
KB2934538
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