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Microsoft small business knowledge base

Article ID: 962007 - Last Review: January 10, 2013 - Revision: 12.0

Support for Windows Vista Service Pack 1 (SP1) ends on July 12, 2011. To continue receiving security updates for Windows, make sure you're running Windows Vista with Service Pack 2 (SP2). For more information, refer to this Microsoft web page: Support is ending for some versions of Windows (http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/help/end-support-windows-xp-sp2-windows-vista-without-service-packs) .

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Summary

The information in this Knowledge Base article is intended for business environments that have system administrators who can implement the details in this article. There is no reason to use this article if your antivirus program is cleaning the virus correctly and if your systems are fully updated. To confirm that the system is clean of the Conficker virus, perform a quick scan from the following Web page: http://www.microsoft.com/security/scanner/ (http://www.microsoft.com/security/scanner/) For detailed information about the Conficker virus, visit the following Microsoft Web page:
http://www.microsoft.com/security/portal/Threat/Encyclopedia/Entry.aspx?Name=Win32%2fConficker (http://www.microsoft.com/security/portal/Threat/Encyclopedia/Entry.aspx?Name=Win32%2fConficker)

Symptoms of infection

If your computer is infected with this worm, you may not experience any symptoms, or you may experience any of the following symptoms:
  • Account lockout policies are being tripped.
  • Automatic Updates, Background Intelligent Transfer Service (BITS), Windows Defender, and Error Reporting Services are disabled.
  • Domain controllers respond slowly to client requests.
  • The network is congested.
  • Various security-related Web sites cannot be accessed.
  • Various security-related tools will not run. For a list of known tools, visit the following Microsoft Web page, and then click the Analysis tab for information about Win32/Conficker.D. For more information, visit the following Microsoft Web page:
    http://www.microsoft.com/security/portal/Entry.aspx?Name=Worm%3aWin32%2fConficker.D (http://www.microsoft.com/security/portal/Entry.aspx?Name=Worm%3aWin32%2fConficker.D)
For more information about Win32/Conficker, visit the following Microsoft Malware Protection Center Web page:
http://www.microsoft.com/security/portal/Entry.aspx?Name=Win32/Conficker (http://www.microsoft.com/security/portal/Entry.aspx?Name=Win32/Conficker)

Propagation methods

Win32/Conficker has multiple propagation methods. These include the following:
  • Exploitation of the vulnerability that is patched by security update 958644 (MS08-067)
  • The use of network shares
  • The use of AutoPlay functionality
Therefore, you must be careful when you clean a network so that the threat is not reintroduced to systems that have previously been cleaned.

Note The Win32/Conficker.D variant does not spread to removable drives or shared folders over a network. Win32/Conficker.D is installed by previous variants of Win32/Conficker.

Prevention

  • Use strong administrator passwords that are unique for all computers.
  • Do not log on to computers by using Domain Admin credentials or credentials that have access to all computers.
  • Make sure all systems have the latest security updates applied.
  • Disable the Autoplay features. For more information, see step 3 of the "Create a Group Policy object" section.
  • Remove excessive rights to shares. This includes removing write permissions to the root of any share.

Mitigation steps

Stop Win32/Conficker from spreading by using Group Policy settings

Notes
  • Important Make sure that you document any current settings before you make any of the changes that are suggested in this article.
  • This procedure does not remove the Conficker malware from the system. This procedure only stops the spread of the malware. You should use an antivirus product to remove the Conficker malware from the system. Or, follow the steps in the "Manual steps to remove the Win32/Conficker virus" section of this Knowledge Base article to manually remove the malware from the system.
  • You may be unable to correctly install applications, service packs, or other updates while the permission changes that are recommended in the following steps are in place. This includes, but is not limited to, applying updates by using Windows Update, Microsoft Windows Server Update Services (WSUS) server, and System Center Configuration Manager (Configuration Manager 2007), as these products rely on components of Automatic Updates. Make sure that you change the permissions back to default settings after you clean the system.
  • For information about the default permissions for the SVCHOST registry key and the Tasks Folder that are mentioned in the "Create a Group Policy object" section, see the Default permissions table at the end of this article.

Create a Group Policy object

Create a new Group Policy object (GPO) that applies to all computers in a specific organizational unit (OU), site, or domain, as required in your environment.

To do this, follow these steps:
  1. Set the policy to remove write permissions to the following registry subkey:
    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Svchost
    This prevents the randomly named malware service from being created in the netsvcs registry value.

    To do this, follow these steps:
    1. Open the Group Policy Management Console (GPMC).
    2. Create a new GPO. Give it any name that you want.
    3. Open the new GPO, and then move to the following folder:
      Computer Configuration\Windows Settings\Security Settings\Registry
    4. Right-click Registry, and then click Add Key.
    5. In the Select Registry Key dialog box, expand Machine, and then move to the following folder:
      Software\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Svchost
    6. Click OK.
    7. In the dialog box that opens, click to clear the Full Control check box for both Administrators and System.
    8. Click OK.
    9. In the Add Object dialog box, click Replace existing permissions on all subkeys with inheritable permissions.
    10. Click OK.
  2. Set the policy to remove write permissions to the %windir%\Tasks folder. This prevents the Conficker malware from creating the Scheduled Tasks that can reinfect the system.

    To do this, follow these steps:
    1. In the same GPO that you created earlier, move to the following folder:
      Computer Configuration\Windows Settings\Security Settings\File System
    2. Right-click File System, and then click Add File.
    3. In the Add a file or folder dialog box, browse to the %windir%\Tasks folder. Make sure that Tasks is highlighted and listed in the Folder dialog box.
    4. Click OK.
    5. In the dialog box that opens, click to clear the check boxes for Full Control, Modify, and Write for both Administrators and System.
    6. Click OK.
    7. In the Add Object dialog box, click Replace existing permissions on all subkeys with inheritable permissions.
    8. Click OK.
  3. Set AutoPlay (Autorun) features to disabled. This keeps the Conficker malware from spreading by using the AutoPlay features that are built into Windows.

    Note Depending on the version of Windows that you are using, there are different updates that you must have installed to correctly disable the Autorun functionality:
    • To disable the Autorun functionality in Windows Vista or in Windows Server 2008, you must have security update 950582 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/950582) installed (described in security bulletin MS08-038).
    • To disable the Autorun functionality in Windows XP, in Windows Server 2003, or in Windows 2000, you must have security update 950582 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/950582) , update 967715 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/967715) , or update 953252 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/953252) installed.
    To set AutoPlay (Autorun) features to disabled, follow these steps:
    1. In the same GPO that you created earlier, move to one of the following folders:
      • For a Windows Server 2003 domain, move to the following folder:
        Computer Configuration\Administrative Templates\System
      • For a Windows 2008 domain, move to the following folder:
        Computer Configuration\Administrative Templates\Windows Components\Autoplay Policies
    2. Open the Turn off Autoplay policy.
    3. In the Turn off Autoplay dialog box, click Enabled.
    4. In the drop-down menu, click All drives.
    5. Click OK.
  4. Close the Group Policy Management Console.
  5. Link the newly created GPO to the location that you want it to apply to.
  6. Allow for enough time for Group Policy settings to update to all computers. Generally, Group Policy replication takes five minutes to replicate to each domain controller, and then 90 minutes to replicate to the rest of the systems. A couple hours should be enough. However, more time may be required, depending on the environment.
  7. After the Group Policy settings have propagated, clean the systems of malware.

    To do this, follow these steps:
    1. Run full antivirus scans on all computers.
    2. If your antivirus software does not detect Conficker, you can use the Microsoft Safety Scanner to clean the malware. For more information, visit the following Microsoft Web page: http://www.microsoft.com/security/scanner/ (http://www.microsoft.com/security/scanner/) Note You may have to follow some manual steps to clean up all the effects of the malware. We recommend that you review the steps that are listed in the "Manual steps to remove the Win32/Conficker virus" section of this article to clean up all the effects of the malware.

Recovery

Run the Microsoft Safety Scanner.

The Microsoft Malware Protection Center has updated the Microsoft Safety Scanner. This is a stand-alone binary that is useful in the removal of prevalent malicious software, and it can help remove the Win32/Conficker malware family.

Note The Microsoft Safety Scanner does not prevent reinfection because it is not a real-time antivirus program.

You can download the Microsoft Safety Scanner from the following Microsoft Web site:
http://www.microsoft.com/security/scanner/ (http://www.microsoft.com/security/scanner/)

Note The Stand-Alone System Sweeper tool will also remove this infection. This tool is available as a component of the Microsoft Desktop Optimization Pack 6.0 or through Customer Service and Support. To obtain the Microsoft Desktop Optimization Pack, visit the following Microsoft Web site:
http://www.microsoft.com/windows/enterprise/technologies/mdop.aspx (http://www.microsoft.com/windows/enterprise/technologies/mdop.aspx)
If Microsoft Security Essentials or Microsoft Forefront Client Security is running on the system, these programs also block the threat before it is installed.

Manual steps to remove the Win32/Conficker virus

Notes
  • These manual steps are not required any longer and should only be used if you have no antivirus software to remove the Conficker virus.
  • Depending on the Win32/Conficker variant that the computer is infected with, some of these values referred to in this section may not have been changed by the virus.
The following detailed steps can help you manually remove Conficker from a system:
  1. Log on to the system by using a local account.

    Important Do not log on to the system by using a Domain account, if it is possible. Especially, do not log on by using a Domain Admin account. The malware impersonates the logged on user and accesses network resources by using the logged on user credentials. This behavior allows for the malware to spread.
  2. Stop the Server service. This removes the Admin shares from the system so that the malware cannot spread by using this method.

    Note The Server service should only be disabled temporarily while you clean up the malware in your environment. This is especially true on production servers because this step will affect network resource availability. As soon as the environment is cleaned up, the Server service can be re-enabled.

    To stop the Server service, use the Services Microsoft Management Console (MMC). To do this, follow these steps:
    1. Depending on your system, do the following:
      • In Windows Vista and Windows Server 2008, click Start, type services.msc in the Start Search box, and then click services.msc in the Programs list.
      • In Windows 2000, Windows XP, and Windows Server 2003, click Start, click Run, type services.msc, and then click OK.
    2. Double-click Server.
    3. Click Stop.
    4. Select Disabled in the Startup type box.
    5. Click Apply.
  3. Remove all AT-created scheduled tasks. To do this, type AT /Delete /Yes at a command prompt.
  4. Stop the Task Scheduler service.
    • To stop the Task Scheduler service in Windows 2000, Windows XP, and Windows Server 2003, use the Services Microsoft Management Console (MMC) or the SC.exe utility.
    • To stop the Task Scheduler service in Windows Vista or in Windows Server 2008, follow these steps.

      Important This section, method, or task contains steps that tell you how to modify the registry. However, serious problems might occur if you modify the registry incorrectly. Therefore, make sure that you follow these steps carefully. For added protection, back up the registry before you modify it. Then, you can restore the registry if a problem occurs. For more information about how to back up and restore the registry, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
      322756  (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/322756/ ) How to back up and restore the registry in Windows
      1. Click Start, type regedit in the Start Search box, and then click regedit.exe in the Programs list.
      2. Locate and then click the following registry subkey:
        HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\Schedule
      3. In the details pane, right-click the Start DWORD entry, and then click Modify.
      4. In the Value data box, type 4, and then click OK.
      5. Exit Registry Editor, and then restart the computer.

        Note The Task Scheduler service should only be disabled temporarily while you clean up the malware in your environment. This is especially true on Windows Vista and Windows Server 2008 because this step will affect various built-in Scheduled Tasks. As soon as the environment is cleaned up, re-enable the Server service.
  5. Download and manually install security update 958644 (MS08-067). For more information, visit the following Microsoft Web site:
    http://www.microsoft.com/technet/security/Bulletin/MS08-067.mspx (http://www.microsoft.com/technet/security/Bulletin/MS08-067.mspx)
    Note This site may be blocked because of the malware infection. In this scenario, you must download the update from an uninfected computer, and then transfer the update file to the infected system. We recommend that you burn the update to a CD because the burned CD is not writable. Therefore, it cannot be infected. If a recordable CD drive is not available, a removable USB memory drive may be the only way to copy the update to the infected system. If you use a removable drive, be aware that the malware can infect the drive with an Autorun.inf file. After you copy the update to the removable drive, make sure that you change the drive to read-only mode, if the option is available for your device. If read-only mode is available, it is typically enabled by using a physical switch on the device. Then, after you copy the update file to the infected computer, check the removable drive to see whether an Autorun.inf file was written to the drive. If it was, rename the Autorun.inf file to something like Autorun.bad so that it cannot run when the removable drive is connected to a computer.
  6. Reset any Local Admin and Domain Admin passwords to use a new strong password. For more information, visit the following Microsoft Web site:
    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc875814.aspx (http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc875814.aspx)
  7. In Registry Editor, locate and then click the following registry subkey:
    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\SvcHost
  8. In the details pane, right-click the netsvcs entry, and then click Modify.
  9. If the computer is infected with the Win32/Conficker virus, a random service name will be listed.

    Note With Win32/Conficker.B, the service name was random letters and was at the bottom of the list. With later variants, the service name may be anywhere in the list and may seem to be more legitimate. If the random service name is not at the bottom, compare your system with the "Services table" in this procedure to determine which service name may have been added by Win32/Conficker. To verify, compare the list in the "Services table" with a similar system that is known not to be infected.

    Note the name of the malware service. You will need this information later in this procedure.
  10. Delete the line that contains the reference to the malware service. Make sure that you leave a blank line feed under the last legitimate entry that is listed, and then click OK.

    Notes about the Services table
    • All the entries in the Services table are valid entries, except for the items that are highlighted in bold.
    • The items that are highlighted in bold are examples of what the Win32/Conficker virus may add to the netsvcs value in the SVCHOST registry key.
    • This may not be a complete list of services, depending on what is installed on the system.
    • The Services table is from a default installation of Windows.
    • The entry that the Win32/Conficker virus adds to the list is an obfuscation technique. The highlighted, malicious entry that is supposed to resemble the first letter is a lowercase "L." However, it is actually an uppercase "I." Because of the font that is used by the operating system, the uppercase "I" seems to be a lowercase "L."

    Services table

    Collapse this tableExpand this table
    Windows Server 2008Windows VistaWindows Server 2003Windows XPWindows 2000
    AeLookupSvcAeLookupSvcAppMgmt6to4EventSystem
    wercplsupportwercplsupportAudioSrvAppMgmtIas
    ThemesThemesBrowserAudioSrvIprip
    CertPropSvcCertPropSvcCryptSvcBrowserIrmon
    SCPolicySvcSCPolicySvcDMServerCryptSvcNetman
    lanmanserverlanmanserverEventSystemDMServerNwsapagent
    gpsvcgpsvcHidServDHCPRasauto
    IKEEXTIKEEXTIasERSvcIaslogon
    AudioSrvAudioSrvIpripEventSystemRasman
    FastUserSwitchingCompatibilityFastUserSwitchingCompatibilityIrmonFastUserSwitchingCompatibilityRemoteaccess
    IasIasLanmanServerHidServSENS
    IrmonIrmonLanmanWorkstationIasSharedaccess
    NlaNlaMessengerIpripNtmssvc
    NtmssvcNtmssvcNetmanIrmonwzcsvc
    NWCWorkstationNWCWorkstationNlaLanmanServer
    NwsapagentNwsapagentNtmssvcLanmanWorkstation
    RasautoRasautoNWCWorkstationMessenger
    RasmanRasmanNwsapagentNetman
    IaslogonIaslogonIaslogonIaslogon
    RemoteaccessRemoteaccessRasautoNla
    SENSSENSRasmanNtmssvc
    SharedaccessSharedaccessRemoteaccessNWCWorkstation
    SRServiceSRServiceSacsvrNwsapagent
    TapisrvTapisrvScheduleRasauto
    WmiWmiSeclogonRasman
    WmdmPmSpWmdmPmSpSENSRemoteaccess
    TermServiceTermServiceSharedaccessSchedule
    wuauservwuauservThemesSeclogon
    BITSBITSTrkWksSENS
    ShellHWDetectionShellHWDetectionTrkSvrSharedaccess
    LogonHoursLogonHoursW32TimeSRService
    PCAuditPCAuditWZCSVCTapisrv
    helpsvchelpsvcWmiThemes
    uploadmgruploadmgrWmdmPmSpTrkWks
    iphlpsvciphlpsvcwinmgmtW32Time
    seclogonseclogonwuauservWZCSVC
    AppInfoAppInfoBITSWmi
    msiscsimsiscsiShellHWDetectionWmdmPmSp
    MMCSSMMCSSuploadmgrwinmgmt
    browserProfSvcWmdmPmSNTermService
    winmgmtEapHostxmlprovwuauserv
    SessionEnvwinmgmtAeLookupSvcBITS
    ProfSvcschedulehelpsvcShellHWDetection
    EapHostSessionEnvhelpsvc
    hkmsvcbrowserxmlprov
    schedulehkmsvcwscsvc
    AppMgmtAppMgmtWmdmPmSN
    sacsvrhkmsvc
  11. In a previous procedure, you noted the name of the malware service. In our example, the name of the malware entry was "Iaslogon." Using this information, follow these steps:
    1. In Registry Editor, locate and then click the following registry subkey, where BadServiceName is the name of the malware service:
      HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\BadServiceName
      For example, locate and then click the following registry subkey:
      HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\Iaslogon
    2. Right-click the subkey in the navigation pane for the malware service name, and then click Permissions.
    3. In the Permissions Entry for SvcHost dialog box, click Advanced.
    4. In the Advanced Security Settings dialog box, click to select both of the following check boxes:
      Inherit from parent the permission entries that apply to child objects. Include these with entries explicitly defined here.

      Replace permission entries on all child objects with entries shown here that apply to child objects.
  12. Press F5 to update Registry Editor. In the details pane, you can now see and edit the malware DLL that loads as "ServiceDll." To do this, follow these steps:
    1. Double-click the ServiceDll entry.
    2. Note the path of the referenced DLL. You will need this information later in this procedure. For example, the path of the referenced DLL may resemble the following:
       %SystemRoot%\System32\doieuln.dll
      Rename the reference to resemble the following:
       %SystemRoot%\System32\doieuln.old
    3. Click OK.
  13. Remove the malware service entry from the Run subkey in the registry.
    1. In Registry Editor, locate and then click the following registry subkeys:
      HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run
      HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run
    2. In both subkeys, locate any entry that begins with "rundll32.exe" and also references the malware DLL that loads as "ServiceDll" that you identified in step 12b. Delete the entry.
    3. Exit Registry Editor, and then restart the computer.
  14. Check for Autorun.inf files on any drives on the system. Use Notepad to open each file, and then verify that it is a valid Autorun.inf file. The following is an example of a typical valid Autorun.inf file.
    [autorun]
    shellexecute=Servers\splash.hta *DVD*
    icon=Servers\autorun.ico
    A valid Autorun.inf is typically 1 to 2 kilobytes (KB).
  15. Delete any Autorun.inf files that do not seem to be valid.
  16. Restart the computer.
  17. Make hidden files visible. To do this, type the following command at a command prompt:
    reg.exe add HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\Advanced\Folder\Hidden\SHOWALL /v CheckedValue /t REG_DWORD /d 0x1 /f
  18. Set Show hidden files and folders so that you can see the file. To do this, follow these steps:
    1. In step 12b, you noted the path of the referenced .dll file for the malware. For example, you noted a path that resembles the following:
      %systemroot%\System32\doieuln.dll
      In Windows Explorer, open the %systemroot%\System32 directory or the directory that contains the malware.
    2. Click Tools, and then click Folder Options.
    3. Click the View tab.
    4. Select the Show hidden files and folders check box.
    5. Click OK.
  19. Select the .dll file.
  20. Edit the permissions on the file to add Full Control for Everyone. To do this, follow these steps:
    1. Right-click the .dll file, and then click Properties.
    2. Click the Security tab.
    3. Click Everyone, and then click to select the Full Control check box in the Allow column.
    4. Click OK.
  21. Delete the referenced .dll file for the malware. For example, delete the %systemroot%\System32\doieuln.dll file.
  22. Enable the BITS, Automatic Updates, Error Reporting, and Windows Defender services by using the Services Microsoft Management Console (MMC).
  23. Turn off Autorun to help reduce the effect of any reinfection. To do this, follow these steps:
    1. Depending on your system, install one of the following updates:
      • If you are running Windows 2000, Windows XP, or Windows Server 2003, install update 967715. For more information, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
        967715  (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/967715/ ) How to disable the Autorun functionality in Windows
      • If you are running Windows Vista or Windows Server 2008, install security update 950582. For more information, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
        950582  (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/950582/ ) MS08-038: Vulnerability in Windows Explorer could allow remote code execution
      Note Update 967715 and security update 950582 are not related to this malware issue. These updates must be installed to enable the registry function in step 23b.
    2. Type the following command at a command prompt:
      reg.exe add HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\Explorer /v NoDriveTypeAutoRun /t REG_DWORD /d 0xff /f
  24. If the system is running Windows Defender, re-enable the Windows Defender autostart location. To do this, type the following command at the command prompt:
    reg.exe add HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run /v "Windows Defender" /t REG_EXPAND_SZ /d "%ProgramFiles%\Windows Defender\MSASCui.exe –hide" /f
  25. For Windows Vista and later operating systems, the malware changes the global setting for TCP Receive Window Autotuning to disabled. To change this setting back, type the following command at a command prompt:
    netsh interface tcp set global autotuning=normal
If, after you complete this procedure, the computer seems to be reinfected, either of the following conditions may be true:
  • One of the autostart locations was not removed. For example, either the AT job was not removed or an Autorun.inf file was not removed.
  • The security update for MS08-067 was installed incorrectly.
This malware may change other settings that are not addressed in this article. Please visit the following Microsoft Malware Protection Center Web page for the latest details about Win32/Conficker:
http://www.microsoft.com/security/portal/Entry.aspx?Name=Win32/Conficker (http://www.microsoft.com/security/portal/Entry.aspx?Name=Win32/Conficker)

Verify that the system is clean

Verify that the following services are started:
  • Automatic Updates (wuauserv)
  • Background Intelligent Transfer Service (BITS)
  • Windows Defender (windefend) (if applicable)
  • Windows Error Reporting Service
To do this, type the following commands at the command prompt. Press ENTER after each command:

Sc.exe query wuauserv
Sc.exe query bits
Sc.exe query windefend
Sc.exe query ersvc

After each command runs, you will receive a message that resembles the following:
SERVICE_NAME: wuauserv
TYPE : 20 WIN32_SHARE_PROCESS
STATE : 4 RUNNING
(STOPPABLE,NOT_PAUSABLE,ACCEPTS_SHUTDOWN)
WIN32_EXIT_CODE : 0 (0x0)
SERVICE_EXIT_CODE : 0 (0x0)
CHECKPOINT : 0x0
WAIT_HINT : 0x0
In this example, "STATE : 4 RUNNING" indicates that the service is running.

To verify the status of the SvcHost registry subkey, follow these steps:
  1. In Registry Editor, locate and then click the following registry subkey:
    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\SvcHost
  2. In the details pane, double-click netsvcs, and then review the service names that are listed. Scroll down to the bottom of the list. If the computer is reinfected with Conficker, a random service name will be listed. For example, in this procedure, the name of the malware service is "Iaslogon."
If these steps do not resolve the issue, contact your antivirus software vendor. For more information about this issue, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
49500  (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/49500/ ) List of antivirus software vendors
If you do not have an antivirus software vendor, or your antivirus software vendor cannot help, contact Microsoft Consumer Support Services for more help.

After the environment is fully cleaned

After the environment is fully cleaned, follow these steps:
  1. Re-enable the Server service and the Task Scheduler service.
  2. Restore the default permissions on the SVCHOST registry key and the Tasks folder. This should be reverted to the default settings by using Group Policy settings. If a policy is only removed, the default permissions may not be changed back. See the table of default permissions in the "Mitigation steps" section for more information.
  3. Update the computer by installing any missing security updates. To do this, use Windows Update, Microsoft Windows Server Update Services (WSUS) server, Systems Management Server (SMS), System Center Configuration Manager (Configuration Manager 2007), or your third-party update management product. If you use SMS or Configuration Manager 2007, you must first re-enable the Server service. Otherwise, SMS or Configuration Manager 2007 may be unable to update the system.

Identifying infected systems

If you have problems identifying systems that are infected with Conficker, the details provided in the following TechNet blog may help:
http://blogs.technet.com/kfalde/archive/2009/01/28/using-logparser-eventcomb-to-find-malware.aspx (http://blogs.technet.com/kfalde/archive/2009/01/28/using-logparser-eventcomb-to-find-malware.aspx)

Default permissions table

The following table shows default permissions for each operating system. These permissions are in place before you apply the changes that we recommend in this article. These permissions may differ from the permissions that are set in your environment. Therefore, you must note your settings before you make any changes. You must do this so that you can restore your settings after you clean the system.
Collapse this tableExpand this table
Operating system Windows Server 2008Windows VistaWindows Server 2003Windows XPWindows 2000
SettingSvchost RegistryTasks FolderSvchost RegistryTasks FolderSvchost RegistryTasks FolderSvchost RegistryTasks FolderSvchost RegistryTasks Folder
Account
Administrators (Local Group)Full ControlFull ControlFull ControlFull ControlFull ControlFull ControlFull ControlFull ControlFull ControlFull Control
SystemFull ControlFull ControlFull ControlFull ControlFull ControlFull ControlFull ControlFull ControlFull ControlFull Control
Power Users (Local Group)not applicablenot applicablenot applicablenot applicableReadnot applicableReadnot applicableReadnot applicable
Users (Local Group)Special not applicableSpecialnot applicableReadnot applicableReadnot applicableReadnot applicable
Apply to: This key and subkeysApply to: This key and subkeys
Query ValueQuery Value
Enumerate SubkeysEnumerate Subkeys
NotifyNotify
Read ControlRead Control
Authenticated Usersnot applicableSpecialnot applicableSpecialnot applicablenot applicablenot applicablenot applicablenot applicablenot applicable
Apply to: This folder onlyApply to: This folder only
Traverse FolderTraverse Folder
List FolderList Folder
Read AttributesRead Attributes
Read Extended AttributesRead Extended Attributes
Create FilesCreate Files
Read PermissionsRead Permissions
Backup Operators (Local Group)not applicablenot applicablenot applicablenot applicablenot applicableSpecialnot applicableSpecial
Apply to: This folder onlyApply to: This folder only
Traverse FolderTraverse Folder
List FolderList Folder
Read AttributesRead Attributes
Read Extended AttributesRead Extended Attributes
Create FilesCreate Files
Read PermissionsRead Permissions
Everyonenot applicablenot applicablenot applicablenot applicablenot applicablenot applicablenot applicablenot applicablenot applicableSpecial
Apply to: This folder, subfolder and files
Traverse Folder
List Folder
Read Attributes
Read Extended Attributes
Create Files
Create Folders
Write Attributes
Write Extended Attributes
Read Permissions

Additional help

  For more help with this issue, if you are located in the United States, you can chat with a live person at Answer Desk: 
Answer Desk (https://answerdesk.support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?mkt=en-us&skuid=4&partnerid=smc&rejoin=0&psrc=ms_smc&entryid=kb_962007_inline&prodcat=virus&productkey=awasaoffervirusremoval)

Applies to
  • Windows Server 2008 Datacenter without Hyper-V
  • Windows Server 2008 Enterprise without Hyper-V
  • Windows Server 2008 for Itanium-Based Systems
  • Windows Server 2008 Standard without Hyper-V
  • Windows Server 2008 Datacenter
  • Windows Server 2008 Enterprise
  • Windows Server 2008 Standard
  • Windows Web Server 2008
  • Windows Vista Service Pack 1, when used with:
    • Windows Vista Business
    • Windows Vista Enterprise
    • Windows Vista Home Basic
    • Windows Vista Home Premium
    • Windows Vista Starter
    • Windows Vista Ultimate
    • Windows Vista Enterprise 64-bit Edition
    • Windows Vista Home Basic 64-bit Edition
    • Windows Vista Home Premium 64-bit Edition
    • Windows Vista Ultimate 64-bit Edition
    • Windows Vista Business 64-bit Edition
  • Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Service Pack 1, when used with:
    • Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Standard Edition (32-bit x86)
    • Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Enterprise Edition (32-bit x86)
    • Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Datacenter Edition (32-bit x86)
    • Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Web Edition
    • Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Datacenter Edition for Itanium-Based Systems
    • Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Enterprise Edition for Itanium-based Systems
  • Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Datacenter x64 Edition
  • Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Enterprise x64 Edition
  • Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Standard x64 Edition
  • Microsoft Windows XP Professional x64 Edition
  • Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Service Pack 2, when used with:
    • Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Standard Edition (32-bit x86)
    • Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Enterprise Edition (32-bit x86)
    • Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Datacenter Edition (32-bit x86)
    • Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Web Edition
    • Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Datacenter x64 Edition
    • Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Enterprise x64 Edition
    • Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Standard x64 Edition
    • Microsoft Windows XP Professional x64 Edition
    • Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Datacenter Edition for Itanium-Based Systems
    • Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Enterprise Edition for Itanium-based Systems
  • Microsoft Windows XP Service Pack 2, when used with:
    • Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition
    • Microsoft Windows XP Professional
  • Microsoft Windows XP Service Pack 3, when used with:
    • Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition
    • Microsoft Windows XP Professional
  • Microsoft Windows 2000 Service Pack 4, when used with:
    • Microsoft Windows 2000 Advanced Server
    • Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional Edition
    • Microsoft Windows 2000 Server
Keywords: 
kbsccm kbregistry kbexpertiseinter kbsecurity kbsecvulnerability kbsurveynew KB962007
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