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Article ID: 970920 - Last Review: October 1, 2010 - Revision: 4.1

Source: Microsoft Support

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Symptom

Process Explorer is a utility that provides information about which handles and dlls each process has open. In the context of Outlook troubleshooting, Process Explorer is commonly used to determine if you have any third-party dlls running under the Outlook.exe process. This is an important step as it raises a possibility that add-ins or other software on your computer may be causing problems in Outlook.

This article provides details on how you can use Process Explorer to output all dll files running under the Outlook.exe process.

More Information



Obtaining Process Explorer

The first thing to do is to obtain the latest version of Process Explorer. It can be downloaded from the following Microsoft TechNet site:

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb896653.aspx (http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb896653.aspx)

Please make sure to read the information on this page to introduce yourself to this tool.
 

Running Process Explorer

After you download and extract Process Explorer, use the following steps to gather the list of dlls running under the Outlook.exe process.

1. Start Outlook. 

2. Double-click Procexp.exe to start Process Explorer. 

3. On the View menu make sure “Show Lower Pane” is checked. 

4. Press CTRL + D or click View - Lower Pane View - DLLs to enable DLL view mode. 

5. In the Process Explorer top pane, scroll down the list of the files and then select Outlook.exe. 

6. After the list of dlls running under Outlook.exe are listed in the bottom pane, click Save As on the File menu. 

7. Save the file as Outlook.exe.txt. 

 
Analyzing the Process Explorer Output

The output text file is a tab-delimited text file that is best opened in Microsoft Excel so you can use the Filter function to quickly locate all non-Microsoft dlls loaded.  

1. Start Microsoft Office Excel and open Outlook.exe.txt. 

2. In the Text Import Wizard use the following options: 
• Delimited 
• Tab delimiter
• General column data format 
3. Scroll down the worksheet and locate the following line: 

Name     Description     Company Name     Version

This is the list of all dlls (Microsoft and 3rd party) running under the Outlook.exe process.

4. Select the cell with “Name” just above the list of dlls and then turn on the Filter feature. 

5. Click the filter drop down in the Name field and then configure a Text Filter with the following parameters: 

Name – Contains - .dll
 
6. Select the filter drop down in the Company Name field and then clear the check boxes containing “Microsoft”. 

 
Identifying Microsoft and 3rd Party dlls
 
The filtered list of dlls displayed using the above steps will contain 3rd party dlls running under Outlook. You can examine the Company Name column to determine the vendor responsible for the dll file.

In the filter list of dlls there are also some dlls that ship with Outlook that do not display “Microsoft” in the Company Name column. To identify these Microsoft dlls, use the following steps:


Outlook 2010

1. Start Outlook 2010. 

2. Click the File tab on the ribbon, then click the Options button. 

3. In the Outlook Options dialog box, click Add-Ins. 

4. To examine COM add-ins, select COM Add-ins in the Manage drop-down and then click Go. 

5. Select each add-in in the COM Add-ins dialog box and then examine the .dll file name in the Location: information in the bottom of the dialog box. The name of the add-in should tell you if the dll file is made by Microsoft. 


Outlook 2007

1. Start Outlook 2007. 

2. On the Tools menu click Trust Center. 

3. In the Trust Center click Add-ins. 

4. To examine COM add-ins, select COM Add-ins in the Manage drop-down and then click Go. 

5. Select each add-in in the COM Add-ins dialog box and then examine the .dll file name in the Location: information in the bottom of the dialog box. The name of the add-in should tell you if the dll file is made by Microsoft. 

 
Outlook 2003 and earlier

1. Start Outlook 2003. 

2. On the Tools menu click Options. 

3. On the Other tab click Advanced Options. 

4. Click COM Add-ins. 

5. Select each add-in in the COM Add-ins dialog box and then examine the .dll file name in the Location: information in the bottom of the dialog box. The name of the add-in should tell you if the dll file is made by Microsoft. 


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APPLIES TO
  • Microsoft Office Outlook 2003
  • Microsoft Office Outlook 2007
Keywords: 
kbrapidpub kbnomt KB970920
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