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Article ID: 973455 - Last Review: April 24, 2012 - Revision: 6.0

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INTRODUCTION

This article describes how to work around various issues that occur when you try to back up or to restore files or folders by using Windows Backup and Restore. When this Windows Backup and Restore issue occurs, you receive the following errors:
  • 0x80070001
  • 0x81000037
  • 0x80070003
Additionally, you may be unable to browse to the files and folders that you want to restore in the File Restore Wizard.

For detailed information, see the “Symptoms,” “Cause,” “Workaround,” and “More information” sections of this article.

SYMPTOMS

Issues that occur when you try to back up files

Issue 1

You receive the following error code when you try to back up files or folders by using Windows Backup and Restore:
0x80070001 (Invalid Function)
This issue occurs when you try to back up a specific library or when you accept the default settings in Windows Backup and Restore.

Click here to view the resolution for this issue.

Issue 2

You receive an error message that resembles the following when you try to back up files or folders by using Windows Backup and Restore:
0x81000037: Windows Backup failed while trying to read from the shadow copy on one of the volumes being backed up
This issue occurs when you try to back up a specific library or when you accept the default settings in Windows Backup and Restore.

Click here to view the resolution for this issue.

Issues that occur when you try to restore files

Issue 3

You cannot use the Browse for files or the Browse for folders functionality to browse to the files and folders that you want to restore in the File Restore Wizard.
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Click here to view the resolution for this issue.

Issue 4

You receive the following error code when you try to restore files or folders in a library by using Windows Backup and Restore:
0x80070003
Click here to view the resolution for this issue.

CAUSE

These issues occur because the folders or libraries that you are trying to back up or restore include a reparse point.
Reparse points resemble Windows shortcuts or to Unix symbolic links. A reparse point may be used to point to a file that is temporarily relocated on a different drive. For example, a reparse point would allow a folder such as C:\DVD to point to Drive E, the actual DVD drive.

Cause of issues that occur when you try to back up files

Issue 1

This issue occurs if the reparse point points to a volume that uses the FAT file system.

Click here to view the resolution for this issue.

Issue 2

This issue occurs if the reparse point is a mounted volume that contains compressed files (for example, multimedia files, .zip files, and so on).

Click here to view the resolution for this issue.

Cause of issues that occur when you try to restore files

Issue 3

This issue occurs if the reparse point points to a mount point or a directory junction to the root of another volume.

Click here to view the resolution for this issue.

Issue 4

This issue occurs if the reparse point is a mount point or junction point to the root of another volume and if one of the following conditions is true:
  • The reparse point directory is deleted and you try to restore files or folders to their original location.
  • You click to select the Restore the files to their original subfolders check box in the File Restore Wizard and you try to restore files or folders to an alternative location.
Click here to view the resolution for this issue.

WORKAROUND

Work around issues that occur when you try to back up files

Issue 1 and Issue 2

To work around these issues, remove the reparse point from the library, and then run the backup wizard again. To back up content for this reparse point (in this case, the FAT volume or the mounted volume), select the absolute path of this location in the Windows Backup configuration user interface.

To locate reparse point folder or its subfolder, follow these steps:
  1. Click Start button, type CMD in the Search program and files box and then press Enter.
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  2. In the Command Prompt window, type DIR /AL /S and then press Enter. The list of JUNCTION (one type of reparse point) list is displayed.

    Note You see several entries that say "junction" and the location that the entries point to (“junction point” is another name for “reparse point”). When a program tries to write to a directory that is really a reparse point, those files are sent (completely blindly to that program) to the other directory instead.
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To delete mounted volume reparse point, follow these steps:
  1. Locate the reparse point you found, right click the reparse point icon and click Properties.
  2. In the General tab, confirm the folder Type is Mounted Volume and then delete this folder.
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Work around issues that occur when you try to restore files

Issue 3

To work around this problemissue, use the Search functionality in the File Restore Wizard to locate the files. To do this, follow these steps:
  1. Click Search.
  2. Enter the keywords in the Search for box, and then click Search.
  3. Click to select the files that you want to restore from the list, and then click OK.
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Issue 4

To work around this issue, re-create the missing directory. To do this, follow these steps:
  1. If the reparse point is deleted, you receive the following example error message:
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  2. Follow the path that is pointed out in the error and create the corresponding folder. In this example, you create the folder MyFolder under Drive C.
  3. Try the restore operation again.
Additionally, click to clear the Restore the files to their original subfolders check box when you run the File Restore Wizard.

MORE INFORMATION

By design, Windows Backup does not traverse reparse points on a computer. However, if a reparse point is directly added to a Windows 7 Library, or if any of the child nodes of a reparse point is directly added to a Windows 7 Library, Windows Backup traverses these locations. This could cause several issues during the backup process.

Note If the reparse point is added to a folder that is already part of a Windows 7 Library, Windows Backup skips the reparse point, and no problem occurs.

For more information about reparse points, visit the following Microsoft Web sites:


APPLIES TO
  • Windows 7 Enterprise
  • Windows 7 Home Basic
  • Windows 7 Home Premium
  • Windows 7 Professional
  • Windows 7 Starter
  • Windows 7 Ultimate
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